Wednesday, January 23, 2019

Is this the first photo of Russia's next-gen UCAV?

AIR FORCES MONTHLY:



An apparent first clear image of Russia’s next-generation unmanned combat air vehicle (UCAV) has appeared. A photo of the Sukhoi-developed Okhotnik was posted on a Russian internet forum, seemingly showing the combat drone undergoing ground tests at the Novosibirsk Aircraft Production Organization (NAPO) in central Russia.

The Okhotnik is one of three large unmanned aerial vehicles currently being developed by Moscow: the Okhotnik combat system is the largest, weighing more than 15 tonnes. The other two UAVs are the one-tonne Inokhodets (considered a counterpart to the US Predator), and the five-tonne Altius-M (broadly analogous to the MQ-9 Reaper).

Strike-Reconnaissance Unmanned Complex

The Okhotnik (hunter) is being developed under the URBK (Udarno-Razvedyvatelnyi Bespilotnyi Kompleks, Strike-Reconnaissance Unmanned Complex), which was pursued in preference to the manned LMFS lightweight fighter.

It was expected that the Sukhoi Design Bureau would concentrate on the URBK once it had completed development of the Su-57 fighter. Intriguingly, photos appeared earlier this week of a Su-57 prototype, T-50-3, in a new scheme including a silhouette of the Okhotnik painted on the tail fin.


Rendering by Akela Freedom 




Blue Origin program hits a new high

CNBC: Blue Origin launched its 10th flight of the New Shepard rocket on Wednesday, in a mission which sent eight NASA research and development experiments into space.

Lifting off from the company's facility in the desert of West Texas, the New Shepard rocket launched the capsule on top past an altitude of 350,000 feet – more than 100 kilometers up.

Blue Origin, which Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos founded nearly two decades ago, is developing the New Shepard rocket system for the company's space tourism business. Six passengers would ride past the edge of space, where they would spend about 10 minutes floating in zero gravity before returning back to Earth. The capsule features massive windows, providing expansive views of the Earth once in space.

NASA pays commercial rocket companies under the agency's Flight Opportunities program to test and demonstrate technologies. Blue Origin has eight payloads on board for NASA programs and academic institutions. The payloads are a variety of experiments, from gathering data on vibration experience during spaceflight to testing a possible solution for cooling electronics on a spacecraft.

Named after Alan Shepard, the first American in space, the New Shepard system is reused by Blue Origin. Reusability is a key part of Blue Origin's plan to turn space tourism into a business. Similar to SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket system, New Shepard's booster – the bottom and largest section of the rocket – launches straight up and then returns straight down to land.

This was the fourth test flight for this individual rocket booster, which is the third booster Blue Origin has built. The company said on Twitter that it has "two rockets in the barn in West Texas," with the latest addition planned to begin "flying humans to space next year."




Friday, January 11, 2019

Uniden announces new super scanner - SDS -200.

Uniden introduces new mobile scanner - the SDS 200.

The SDS200 incorporates the latest True I/Q receiver technology, which provides the best digital decode performance in the industry, even in challenging receive environments.

The SDS200's other major features includes:


3.5" Customizable Color Display
1.5X Din-E (300 mm x 75 mm) chassis
Ext. Sp. Jack
Auxiliary USB Type A jack for future expansion
Ethernet connectivity for remote streaming and control*
Trunktracker X
APCO P25 Phase I and II
Motorola, EDACS, and LTR Trunking
MotoTRBO Capacity + and Connect +**
DMR Tier III**
Hytera XPT**
Single-Channel DMR**
NXDN 4800 and 9600**
EDACS ProVoice**
Location-Based Scanning
USA/Canada Radio Database
ZIP Code Selection for Easy Setup
GPS Connectivity for simple mobile operation
Close Call™ RF Capture with Do Not Disturb
8 GB micro SD
Soft Keys for Intelligent UI
Recording, Playback, and Replay
Temporary Avoid
Fire Tone-Out Alert
System Analysis and Discovery
CTCSS/DCS/NAC/RAN/Color Code Decoding
S.A.M.E. Weather Alert
Enhanced Dynamic Memory
Preemptive Trunking Priority
Multi-Site System Scanning
Fully Customizable Scanning with your own Favorites Lists
Backlit Keypad
Channel Volume Offset
PC Programming and Control
USB Connectivity
Weekly Database Updates
Free Sentinel Software keeps the SDS200 database and memory up to date
Frequency Coverage:
25-512 MHz
758-824 MHz
849-869 MHz
895-960 MHz
1240-1300 MHz

* Additional or 3rd-Party software may be required.
** Paid upgrades required for DMR, NXDN, and ProVoice monitoring

Wednesday, December 26, 2018

SIKORSKY-BOEING rolls out SB-1 Defiant prototype

click to enlarge 

BREAKING DEFENSE: After years of secrecy and CGI, we’re finally getting to see the Sikorsky-Boeing dream team’s SB>1 Defiant ultra-high-speed helicopter in real life. Unfortunately, Defiant is still on the ground, not flying: It was supposed to take its first flight this month, but that’s been pushed back until early 2019.

That puts the Sikorsky-Boeing team more than a year behind archrival Bell, their competitor for the massive Future Vertical Lift program, whose V-280 Valor has been flying for more than a year. But at least part of the delay is due to how revolutionary the Defiant is compared to Valor — and the difference between designs is why it’s so crucial that we see full testing of them both.

Where most helicopters would have a tail rotor, the Defiant has a pusher propeller. That propeller allows Defiant to reach turboprop speeds, like a tiltrotor, but, unlike a tiltrotor, Defiant never stops being a helicopter. Sikorsky and Boeing say that will make for a much more agile aircraft, especially at low speeds. Now they finally have a finished prototype for testing to prove those claims.

Monday, November 26, 2018

Hypersonic Boost Glide program will have test launches from 2020-2022


DARPA and the US Army Operational Fires (OpFires) program will develop and demonstrate a novel ground-launched hypersonic boost-glide weapons to penetrate modern enemy air defenses and rapidly and precisely engage critical time-sensitive targets. Aerojet Rocketdyne, Exquadrum, and Sierra Nevada Corporation have been given contracts.

OpFires seeks to develop innovative propulsion solutions that will enable a mobile, ground-launched tactical weapons delivery system capable of carrying a variety of payloads to a variety of ranges. Phase 1 of the program will be a 12-month effort focused on early development and demonstration of booster solutions that provide variable thrust propulsion across robust operational parameters in large tactical missiles.

“OpFires represents a critical capability development in support of the Army’s investments in long-range precision fires,” says DARPA’s OpFires program manager, Maj. Amber Walker (U.S. Army). “These awards are the first step in the process to deliver this capability in support of U.S. overmatch.”

The OpFires program will conduct a series of subsystem tests designed to evaluate component design and system compatibility for future tactical operating environments. Phase 2 will mature designs and demonstrate performance with hot/static fire tests targeted for late 2020. Phase 3, which will focus on weapon system integration, will culminate in integrated end-to-end flight tests in 2022.


LinkWithin

Blog Widget by LinkWithin