Tuesday, May 14, 2019

FBI uncovers terror traing camp in Alabama


JIHADWATCH.ORG

MAY 12, 2019 10:30 AM BY CHRISTINE DOUGLASS-WILLIAMS


The FBI has uncovered a homegrown terror training camp in Alabama. “The property, similar to another compound in New Mexico the group is now linked to where federal prosecutors say Wahhaj and four other suspects were training children to carry out deadly terror attacks on American soil.” The children were said to be living under abusive conditions. In mid March, a federal grand jury in New Mexico indicted the five Muslims. The leader of the group, Siraj Wahhaj, is the “son of Imam Siraj Wahhaj, a former board member of the Council on American-Islamic Relations” (CAIR). And while the imam is not responsible for his son’s actions, he himself “is on record urging a violent overthrow of the ‘filthy’ U.S. government. The elder Wahhaj gave an opening prayer at an event at the Democratic National Convention in 2012.”

Despite the mainstream media downplaying of the existence of of jihadi training camps, such camps are believed to be dispersed in various locations. The Jamad al Fruco group claims to have 22 training camps across the country.


WASHINGTON (SBG) – At first glance, it looks like an abandoned dump.

But this plot of land in Macon County, Alabama is described in an FBI search warrant as a “makeshift military-style obstacle course” belonging to a small group of terrorists led by Siraj Wahhaj who owned the property up a long dirt road but just a few miles from downtown Tuskegee.

“Just because you’re in a small town or a small state does not mean you might not potentially have individuals engaged in the types of activities that would call into question threats to national security,” says Tim Fuhrman, Former Special Agent with the FBI field office in Mobile, Alabama.

The property, similar to another compound in New Mexico the group is now linked to where federal prosecutors say Wahhaj and four other suspects were training children to carry out deadly terror attacks on American soil.

FBI Assistant Director for the Counterterrorism Division Michael McGarrity told lawmakers on Capitol Hill there are 850 open domestic terrorism investigations, with 40% racially motivated violent extremism.

“The threat of domestic terrorism exists in every region of the United States and affects all walks of life.”…..

Monday, April 15, 2019

AVX/L3 enters Army competition for U.S. Army Future Attack Reconnaissance Aircraft






AVX
NASHVILLE, Tenn.--()--The AVX Aircraft Company and L3 Technologies (NYSE:LLL) announced today their innovative compound coaxial helicopter (CCH) design, which is competing for Phase 1 of the U.S. Army Future Attack Reconnaissance Aircraft (FARA)-Competitive Prototype (CP) program competition.

The innovative design solution will exceed the reconnaissance and light-attack mission of FARA with a high-performing and survivable platform. AVX-L3 CCH will meet 100 percent of mandatory requirements and exceed 70 percent of them. The CCH design, combined with rigorous engineering and production processes and certifications, will deliver a safe, performance-driven, affordable aircraft capable of operating in highly contested airspace and degraded environments for extended periods.
“This FARA-CP solution provides L3 and AVX an opportunity to demonstrate the agility and innovation that sets our team apart in support of the U.S. Army’s modernization priorities,” said Christopher E. Kubasik, Chairman, Chief Executive Officer and President of L3 Technologies. “We are collaborating to deliver a prototype that provides powerful leap-ahead capability for our warfighters at an affordable life-cycle cost.”
“We are extremely pleased to reveal the design for this very important U.S. Army program,” said Troy Gaffey, AVX CEO and Chief Engineer. “AVX and L3 provide unique engineering design skills and manufacturing expertise that will provide the Army with an advanced, lethal and affordable reconnaissance and light-attack platform.”
The companies’ next-generation single-engine design, paired with a wing for lift during high-speed forward flight, provides leap-ahead capabilities in a faster, lighter and more lethal aircraft that requires less maintenance through its life cycle, featuring:
  • A fly-by-wire, side-by-side cockpit optimized for pilot efficiency
  • Two ducted fans that provide forward and reverse thrust for both high-speed operation and agility
  • State-of-the-art modern open systems architecture (MOSA)-based digital backbone and avionics systems
  • A small form factor that meets C-17 loading and Navy DDG shipboard size limits through manually folding blades and wings
  • Modularity that provides for component reuse and a high degree of systems commonality across all of the U.S. Army capability sets

Monday, March 25, 2019

New Bell 525 spotted on ramp in Amarillo.

(c) STEVE DOUGLASS

The Bell 525 Relentless is an American medium-lift helicopter, under development by Bell Helicopter. The Bell 525 was unveiled at the 2012 Heli-Expo in Dallas, Texas in February 2012. The helicopter first flew on 1 July 2015. It is designed to transport up to 19 passengers.

On July 6, 2016, the prototype crashed during a test flight, killing the two occupants.The aircraft broke up in flight[14] while traveling about 229 mph at an altitude of about 2,000 feet.[15] In January 2018, the US National Transportation Safety Board released its findings, saying that the aircraft had suffered from severe inflight vibrations, which resulted in a loss of rotor RPM, subsequent rotor flapping and rotor impact with the tailboom, causing the inflight break-up. Contributing causes were collective biomechanical feedback which caused the tailcone to pulsate at 6 cycles/second, plus the attitude and heading reference system response, "both of which occurred due to the lack of protections in the flight-control laws against the sustainment and growth of adverse feedback loops when the 6-hertz airframe vibration initiated." Further causes included the lack of software safeguards designed in and the lack of a low rotor RPM indicator. The investigation was hampered by Bell not recording cockpit audio or imagery during the flight.

After the accident, Bell amended the control paradigm, improving the filter on side-stick controller inputs to block transmission of stick vibrations to the rotor system. Filtering was also added to the control system to account for gusts and maneuver loads.

The crash delayed certification from 2017 to 2018. In February 2018, Bell predicted certification to be completed by late 2018 or early 2019.[1] In December 2018, 1,300h of turn time and 900h of flight were accumulated, towards a 2019 US type certification. In early 2019, two helicopters will be tested in cold weather in Yellowknife, Canada, as a third prototype will validate performance in snowy north continental USA.

First flight is expected within the next two weeks.

PHOTO BY STEVE DOUGLASS 

Tuesday, February 26, 2019

Boeing set to unveil RAAF's "Loyal Wingman"

Andrew Greene for ABC AU

A large drone designed for electronic warfare, which could eventually carry bombs, will be publicly unveiled today after being secretly developed with the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF).

The drone is the first combat aircraft designed and developed in Australia in more than 50 years
The cost of the project has not been revealed, but it is believed to be Boeing's largest investment in drones outside the US
Once fully developed, the drone could eventually be exported to other nations, sources said

The unmanned system is roughly the size of a traditional jet fighter and was quietly developed in Brisbane by aerospace giant Boeing, in collaboration with the RAAF and the Defence Department.

A prototype of the yet-to-be-named unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) is expected to be unveiled this morning by Defense Minister Christopher Pyne at the Avalon aerospace trade show outside Melbourne.

Details of the classified "Loyal Wingman" project remain scant, but the ABC believes the UAV is designed to fly up to several thousand kilometres.

Its primary purpose would be to conduct electronic warfare and reconnaissance missions, particularly in environments where it is considered risky to send manned aircraft.

On the aircraft's underside is a large payload bay that can carry a sensor or electronic warfare equipment, but industry sources said it could also be used to one day carry bombs.

Wednesday, January 23, 2019

Is this the first photo of Russia's next-gen UCAV?

AIR FORCES MONTHLY:



An apparent first clear image of Russia’s next-generation unmanned combat air vehicle (UCAV) has appeared. A photo of the Sukhoi-developed Okhotnik was posted on a Russian internet forum, seemingly showing the combat drone undergoing ground tests at the Novosibirsk Aircraft Production Organization (NAPO) in central Russia.

The Okhotnik is one of three large unmanned aerial vehicles currently being developed by Moscow: the Okhotnik combat system is the largest, weighing more than 15 tonnes. The other two UAVs are the one-tonne Inokhodets (considered a counterpart to the US Predator), and the five-tonne Altius-M (broadly analogous to the MQ-9 Reaper).

Strike-Reconnaissance Unmanned Complex

The Okhotnik (hunter) is being developed under the URBK (Udarno-Razvedyvatelnyi Bespilotnyi Kompleks, Strike-Reconnaissance Unmanned Complex), which was pursued in preference to the manned LMFS lightweight fighter.

It was expected that the Sukhoi Design Bureau would concentrate on the URBK once it had completed development of the Su-57 fighter. Intriguingly, photos appeared earlier this week of a Su-57 prototype, T-50-3, in a new scheme including a silhouette of the Okhotnik painted on the tail fin.


Rendering by Akela Freedom 




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